Hostel decorations: Equity Point Prague’s “Kofola”

Kofola room201

At Equity Point Prague we’ve got a room dedicated to Kofola and not to Coca cola. So, what’s the connection?

Originated in the Czechoslovak pharmaceutical company Galena, (located in Opava) in 1959 during research targeted at finding a possible use for surplus caffeine produced in the process of coffee roasting. The resulting dark-coloured, sweet-and-sour syrup Kofo became the main ingredient of a new soft drink named Kofola introduced in 1960.

During the 1960s and 1970s Kofola became exceedingly popular in Czechoslovakia because it substituted for Western cola-based drinks like Coca-Cola or Pepsi, which were not generally available. Continue reading

Hostel decorations: Equity Point Prague’s “Kladrubský”

Kladruber printing room 306

The Kladruber (Czech Kladrubský kun) is the oldest Czech horse breed and one of the world’s oldest and it’s considered very rare. We have a room at Equity Point Prague to commemorate it.

The main breeding center is in National stud farm Kladruby nad Labem in the Czech Republic where Kladrubers have been bred for more than 400 years. Kladrubers have always been bred to be a galakarosier – a heavy type of carriage horse for the court of the House of Habsburg.

Bred in Kladruby nad Labem national stud, the Kladruber breed is almost 400 years old, yet is remarkably rare (492 mares as of January, 2011). Kladruby stud was founded in 1579 by Rudolf II as an Imperial stud, at the Perlstein stables.

The breed was based on imported Spanish (such as the Andalusian) and Italian horses, crossed with Neapolitan, Danish, Holstein, Irish, and Oldenburg blood, in addition to the heavy Czech breeds. The animal was first developed to be a galakarosier; a heavy type of carriage horse used to pull the imperial coach, usually in a four- or six-in-hand, at ceremonies and funerals.

It originally came in a variety of colors, including palomino and appaloosa, although today the breed is strictly gray or black, due to a breeding program requiring 18 “white” (i.e. fully mature grays) and 18 black stallions for various ceremonies of the court.

Hostel decorations: Equity Point Prague’s “Barrandov Studios”

Barrandov Studios

Hollywood and Czech Republic: What’s the connection?

Barrandov Studios is a famous set of film studios in Prague, Czech Republic. It is the largest film studio in the country and one of the largest in Europe. Several of the movies filmed there won Oscars.

Czech film history is closely connected with that of Prague’s entrepreneurial Havel family, and especially with the activities of the brothers Miloš Havel (1899–1968) and Václav Havel (1897–1979) (Václav was the father of the Czech President of the same name).

In 1921 Miloš Havel created the A-B Joint Stock Company by merging his American Film distribution company with the Biografia film distributors.

At present the studios are often called the “European Hollywood” or “Hollywood of the East” and many films have been filmed there, such as Mission Impossible, The Bourne Identity, Casino Royale, Prince Caspian, and many others.

Hostel decorations: Equity Point Prague’s “Bohemian Crystal”

Bohemian Crystal Room

BOHEMIAN CRYSTAL ROOM

Today, precious design it’s our subject. Bohemian glass, or Bohemia crystal, is a decorative glass produced in regions of Bohemia and Silesia, now in the current state of the Czech Republic, since the 13th century.

Oldest archaeology excavations of glass-making sites date to around 1250 and are located in the Lusatian Mountains of Northern Bohemia.

Bohemia was a part of the Austro/Hungarian Empire now part of the Czech Republic, and was famous for its beautiful and colourful glass. Continue reading

Hostel decorations: Equity Point Prague’s “Sugar cubes”

Sugar Cubes

Now-a-days going to have a coffee and put some sugar cubes is a normal action. But when they were born?

Sugar cubes were first produced in the nineteenth century. In the 1840s, Juliana Rad, who was married to the head of a sugar refinery in Moravia –Czech Republic–, cut a finger while chopping sugar. She complained to her husband, perhaps while waving her bandaged hand: Why not make units of sugar that would come perfectly sized for one cup of tea?

Jakub Krystof Rad’s innovation was to use a press to make the cubes, and he soon presented a box of them to his wife. Continue reading